Republic Pictures Home Video

From the Audiovisual Identity Database, the motion graphics museum


Background

In 1984, to coincide with NTA's own rebranding as Republic Pictures Corporation, the home video division was renamed itself to Republic Pictures Home Video. In addition to its existing public domain line, Spotlite Video, the division also launched Inspiration Video to release religious material. Both labels were eventually dissolved in 1986, with Republic being the only surviving company.

The division released material from it's catalog and later released other material such as Gene Autry's Golden West Television catalog (including one of his only two color features, The Big Sombrero). After Republic's purchase by Spelling Entertainment in 1994, they merged their existing home video unit Worldvision Home Video into Republic's, allowing the business to release Spelling material as well. By 1996, the home video unit was the only operational part of the then-renamed Republic Entertainment, Inc. after Spelling shuttered the theatrical division.

In 1998, before Spelling's full purchase by Viacom, they shuttered the home video unit and instead signed a deal with Artisan Entertainment to release Republic's movies on home video and using the logo under license.

Currently, Republic's assets are released on Home Media in North America by Olive Films, under license from Paramount Pictures.


1st Logo (1985-1987)


Visuals: It's basically the same as the 1985 Republic Pictures logo, except a few seconds later, "HOME VIDEO" fades in below the company name.

Variant: An early "prototype" variant showed the text in a plain yellow Helvetica font which zooms in from behind the volcano. Also, the clouds don't move.

Technique: Same as the 1985 Republic Pictures logo, with fading effects for the text "HOME VIDEO".

Audio: None, but on some video releases, a light synth tune is heard.

Availability: Appears on Republic Pictures videos from the '80s. Look at the tape case for a print version of this logo; it's printed exactly as it appears on-screen. One such release is the two-tape set of the 1939 serial Daredevils of the Red Circle. The "prototype" version appeared on a 1987 Betamax of The Men (1950), which used a 1985 video master. From 1987 to 1989, Republic Pictures' home video releases lack its home video signifier, its just the standard Republic Pictures logo from the era.

2nd Logo (3rd logo placeholder) (1989)


Visuals: Over a grey gradient background is the Republic Pictures print logo on the left. The eagle and the mountain are in monochrome, and the sky is Turkish blue. The words "REPUBLIC PICTURES HOME VIDEO" appears in orange and seen in its usual font.

Technique: None. [possible misuse]

Audio: None.

Availability: It's only seen on the 1989 VHS of Brothers in Arms. Unlike the previous logo, this logo's print counterpart is no guarantee of its on-screen appearance.

Legacy: This is merely a placeholder for the next logo below.

3rd Logo (1989-1996)


Visuals: Same as the 1988 Republic Pictures logo, but the text below instead reads as "REPUBLIC PICTURES HOME VIDEO". Also, the background is lighter.

Variant: On a laserdisc of The Quiet Man is just the eagle and volcano at first, and a few seconds later the text appears.

Technique: None. [possible misuse]

Audio: None.

Availability: Seen on prints of some Republic Pictures videos from the early 90s. Though it officially ended in 1993, this logo continued to appear mostly on trailers for another few years. This was retained on the 2002 Artisan DVD of The Quiet Man. This is also preserved on Lionsgate DVDs of Republic Pictures films. Surprisingly, it appears on TCM's prints of The Fabulous Dorseys and Venus in Furs, and at the beginning of a UK GREAT! Movies Classic airing of The Flying Deuces. Also appears on a British VHS of The Langoliers.

Final Note

After 1993, Republic Pictures began to simply use their regular logo at the time for home video releases.

NTA Home Entertainment
Republic Pictures Home Video
Artisan Entertainment
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